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Tuesday, 27 July 2021 00:00

Peripheral neuropathy refers to nerve damage of the nerves outside of the central nervous system. The peripheral nerves located in the lower limbs are frequent sites of nerve damage due to neuropathy. There are many potential causes for this condition. These include factors such as alcohol use or vitamin or nutrient deficiency, hereditary disorders, exposure to environmental toxins, or other medical conditions like diabetes, kidney failure, autoimmune diseases, and infections. Cancer patients may develop peripheral neuropathy as a consequence of chemotherapy. Peripheral neuropathy can also occur without a known cause. This is known as idiopathic neuropathy. If you are experiencing symptoms of nerve damage in your lower limbs, such as tingling, numbness, weakness, or coldness, it is suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist.

Neuropathy

Neuropathy can be a potentially serious condition, especially if it is left undiagnosed. If you have any concerns that you may be experiencing nerve loss in your feet, consult with one of our podiatrists from Accent Podiatry Associates. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment for neuropathy.

What Is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition that leads to damage to the nerves in the body. Peripheral neuropathy, or neuropathy that affects your peripheral nervous system, usually occurs in the feet. Neuropathy can be triggered by a number of different causes. Such causes include diabetes, infections, cancers, disorders, and toxic substances.

Symptoms of Neuropathy Include:

  • Numbness
  • Sensation loss
  • Prickling and tingling sensations
  • Throbbing, freezing, burning pains
  • Muscle weakness

Those with diabetes are at serious risk due to being unable to feel an ulcer on their feet. Diabetics usually also suffer from poor blood circulation. This can lead to the wound not healing, infections occurring, and the limb may have to be amputated.

Treatment

To treat neuropathy in the foot, podiatrists will first diagnose the cause of the neuropathy. Figuring out the underlying cause of the neuropathy will allow the podiatrist to prescribe the best treatment, whether it be caused by diabetes, toxic substance exposure, infection, etc. If the nerve has not died, then it’s possible that sensation may be able to return to the foot.

Pain medication may be issued for pain. Electrical nerve stimulation can be used to stimulate nerves. If the neuropathy is caused from pressure on the nerves, then surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Arlington and Mansfield, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Wednesday, 21 July 2021 00:00

Plantar warts are small growths that develop on parts of the feet that bear weight. They're typically found on the bottom of the foot. Don't live with plantar warts, and call us today!

Tuesday, 20 July 2021 00:00

Heel pain is a very common disorder. While stress fractures, bursitis, fat pad atrophy, tarsal tunnel syndrome, sever’s disease, and bone spurs can cause heel pain, its most common source is plantar fasciitis. When the plantar fascia—the fibrous connective tissue on the bottom of the feet that links the heel with the forefoot—becomes torn or damaged, plantar fasciitis occurs. This condition can be caused by sudden trauma, or prolonged wear and tear, that affects the plantar fascia. With plantar fasciitis, the heel can become thickened, inflamed, and painful. People who are more at risk of damaging the plantar fascia include those who are obese, stand for prolonged periods of time, and wear flat-soled or un-supportive shoes. If you are experiencing heel pain, contact a podiatrist for an exam, diagnosis and treatment appropriate for your condition.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact one of our podiatrists of Accent Podiatry Associates. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our offices located in Arlington and Mansfield, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 13 July 2021 00:00

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a condition in which blood flow to the lower limbs is reduced. This can cause symptoms such as leg cramping, pain, numbness, weakness, and difficulty walking. PAD can be described as being either occlusive or functional. Occlusive PAD means that something is physically blocking the blood flow in arteries. This is usually plaque, which builds up in the arteries and makes them narrow and harden over time, but arteries can also be blocked because of abnormal thickening of the artery walls. Functional PAD occurs when the arteries cease to function properly due to abnormal relaxation or constriction of the artery walls. If you are experiencing the symptoms of PAD, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist who can help you manage this condition.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with one of our podiatrists from Accent Podiatry Associates. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Arlington and Mansfield, TX . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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